Cud, Rich And Strange (1992)

Cud-Rich--StrangeSQ

Artist: Cud
Title: Rich And Strange
Description: single; album track, Asquarius
Label: A&M
Release date: 1992
First heard: 1992

Holy Moses, here we go again …

OK, here’s the timeline.

1985 Cud form around various art courses at Leeds Polytechnic
1990 Cud’s second proper album Leggy Mambo, on Imaginary, reaches me at the NME. I love it
16 October 1991 I see Cud live for the first time and meet them afterwards at Manchester International II
27 May 1992 I see Cud for the second time live at Wakefield Rooftop Gardens and sit in for AWOL drummer Steve Godwin for Rich And Strange at the soundcheck (photographic evidence is taken of this momentous occasion)
June 1992 I see Cud live at Glastonbury
July 1992 As features editor of NME, I commission Cud’s first and only NME cover story (but do not write it)
1995 Cud split
2006 Cud re-form
2003-2011 I develop a happy if inaccurate reputation for being the only DJ on 6 Music who plays Cud (although I do play them a lot)
11 November 2012 Cud invite me to sit it on the drums again at Brixton Academy to play Rich And Strange when they support Carter USM and the Neds, this time to an actual audience of fans. It is one of the greatest moments of my life

Now, can I separate my love of this song and this band from my own personal history with both? Yes, is the resounding answer. (And in any case, when was The 143 not personal?) I will state for the record that, as the timeline indicates, I fell for Cud’s crazy, toe-tapping pop-rock music before meeting them as tremendous people. And I’d already identified Rich And Strange as a high watermark of their already prolific canon based on a promo cassette of it, which will have arrived from A&M Records in the NME mailbag in early 1992. They hooked me in with their music, these voluble art-rockers, and then landed me with their personalities. But what is a great band if not the sum of its own members’ personalities? Cud stood out then, and stand out now, because they created their own cool, rather than follow a signposted footpath. In Carl Puttnam, they had a singer who could sing and a frontman who could front, but did neither job as per the standardised job description.

In the more finely-tuned and less accidental third LP Asquarius, with a major label behind them and the marketing and formatting that once came with that pre-digital patronage, Cud skirted briefly with the mainstream, and they had the hooks and the ideas to live there, but they were, and are, a fringe proposition with their comic timing and their awful shirts, and it suits them, as much as the shirts did, or do. That bassist William Potter, the band’s own Boswell and apparent treasurer, is a comic artist, and Puttnam a painter (his daubing forms the sleeve of Rich And Strange), feeds into not just their sleeves but their attitude: pop as art.

Rich And Strange, whose intricately syncopated drum signatures I will now take to my grave, is a tight, bright, almost claustrophobically self-contained glam racket. It creates a kitchen-sink drama in which Puttnam bellows of lonely tigers in a basement and hurtling “flushed and brash” into “some crazy scheme”. In the words of Tom Waits, what’s he building in there? Our protagonist seems to be looking for love (“a kiss is too much”) and wounded by loss (“you must remember when you loved me like a friend”), but remains upbeat (“I’m never fed up”), wearing his self-awareness like a belt buckle: “I’m fat but I know where it’s at.” (If crueler observers ever thought of Carl as “fat” in the early 90s, it just goes to show how goalposts move.) Mike Dunphy’s guitar comes in starbursts during the verse then scales the heights of melodrama come the chorus, while Godwin’s line of duty never falters and Potter’s bass throbs away.

Having learned and played the drums to this song (don’t know if I mentioned it), I can report that it’s never off the splash cymbals, and that may explain the sheer, crashing, underlined joy it exudes. It is deceptively rich, albeit explicitly strange. A rare Top 30 hit during Cud’s commercial purple patch, the charts were a more interesting place with them in them.

Because Cud don’t fit into any movement (at Select, we gamely shoehorned them into what wasn’t called our 1993 Britpop issue, and I rated Puttnam four out of five in a concurrent sidebar rating indie’s frontfolk for “star quality”, stating, “Cud’s affable, frizzy-haired, chest-beating vocal acrobat minted ’70s retro chic and now carries Crimplenist mantle with much elan”), they are oft forgotten when matters epochal are discussed. But these four men lured to Leeds from Essex, Northumberland, Derbyshire and Surrey (all but one still trading as the Cud Band) boot-stomped a significant footnote into history. They’re one of my favourites, hope they’re one of yours.

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2 thoughts on “Cud, Rich And Strange (1992)

  1. Just offering an alternative view…

    For me Cud’s high water mark was Hey!wire. I can’t claim to have been there from the start (and I’ve never seen them live – I’ve seen virtually no one live) but I had (and still have) the Mind The Gap 12″ (on Reception!), and Under My Hat too, I think. And the split single with The Family Cat. And Lola in blue and red covers. And the single-sided Hey!wire 7″ is just… over… there. And…

    OK, I bought whatever was put in front of me. But although I loved Hey!wire, I seemed to be in a minority in being disappointed by Leggy Mambo itself. I think I was unsure about what seemed to be a less tongue-in-cheek approach to the song writing. They probably considered it maturing. And what would I know anyway? But it felt like maybe they were grasping for a crossover.

    I was never an indie snob – I really liked Oh No Won’t Do a lot – and Through The Roof was fine too. But I really didn’t like Rich And Strange. And I still don’t. There, I’ve said it. It just doesn’t go anywhere. And I think even at the time I knew that they weren’t going any further than this – chart-wise. And maybe I blamed the song a bit for that too – and for the sense of sadness that went with it. Although I’m sure it wouldn’t have made any difference, I still really wish they’d charted with a better single. It wasn’t the last Cud record I bought but it was never the same after that. Having been a kind of effortless laugh generating much good will, they’d become a commodity being marketed cynically (OK, tautology) by A&M – and they were a failing brand.

    I wasn’t their biggest fan. As far as I can recall, I never drummed with them. But they felt like my band – or at least one of my bands. “Where are we going, fellas? To the top, Johnny! And where’s that, fellas? The toppermost of the poppermost!” It’s such an irrelevant thing to aspire to. Yet I’d have loved them to make it there. And I’m sure they would have too. But the way I see it – and this is what I saw even as Rich And Strange was entering the charts – they died in the attempt. Like so many other bands did. (And Cud weren’t even on Virgin!) It wasn’t Rich And Strange’s fault. But I blame it nonetheless.

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